Navaho and Apache vs. Tibeto-Burman languages

Navaho and Apache vs. Tibeto-Burman languages

Native American Indians relate to Burmese?

Some famous linguists like Edwin Pulleyblank believe that there are certain relationship between Sino-Tibetan, Tibeto-Burman and the Athabascan group of Native American languages, including Navaho, Apache, Eskimo ethnic tribes.

Table of Nations and Languages
Middle East Shem Elam, Asshur, Lud, Arpachshad, Aram (Semite) Ham Negro and Mongoloid
Jew
עברית
Semite
ייִדיש
Iranian
Farsi
Arab North Africa Saudi Africa South Africa
Afrikaans
East Africa
Zulu
Native American
Jew Babylonian
Assyrian
Syrian
Lebanese
Yemeni
Berber
Arab Tribal Barrineans
Babylonian Libyan
Moroccan
Arab
Arabic
Marathi
Gujarathi
India Bantu
Kiswahili
New Guinea Eskimo
Cherokee
Middle
East
Ethiopian
Amharic
Somali
Egyptian
Maltese
Hausa
Bengali
Tamil
Oriya
Telugu
Kannada
Africa Mbuti Adamanese English
Español
Kootenai
Pueblo
Czech
Latin
Serbian
Croatian
Shqipe
Armenian
India Indian
Hindi
Yoruba
Ibo
Negrito
Bushmen
Chinese America
Iberian
Español
Português
Greek
Български
Italian
European Lithuanian
Latvian
Româneşte
Punjabi
Pakistan
Pashto
Sinhala
Gurmukhi
Malayalam
Chinese Inuit
Aleut
Svenska
Norsk
Icelandic
Greenlandic
Slovenščina
Slovenčina
Dari ﻯﺭﺩ
Kurdi
Asia Cebuano
Malayu
Ainu
日本語
नेपाली
Plautdietsch European Украïнська Georgian Türkçe North East African Sindhi Burmese Mandarin Mongolian
Nordic
Deutsch
Nederlands
Alpine
Français
Gaelic
Europe Türkmençe
Uzbek
Kazakh
Hiligaynon
Tagalog
Tiêng Viêt
Kyrgyz
Thai
Maori
繁體中文
简体中文
한국어
Tibetan
Lapp, Finn
Finnish
English Русский Dansk Polski Urdu اردو Khmer Indonesian Uma Cantonese Hungarian
Japheth Indo-European West Asia Africa, East Asia, America and Oceania
Gomer, Magog, Madai, Tubal, Meshech, Tiras, Javan The 10/40 Window Cush, Mizraim, Put, Canaan

This table composed and copyright by Teaching Hearts http://www.teachinghearts.org/dre17httgospel.html



Myanmar Pali Stone Inscriptions found in Comalcalco, Central America

Could they have relationship around AD 900s?

Here is an extract from: http://www.foxvox.org/foxvoxarchive/2000_12_31_foxvoxarchive.htm

  • Comalcalco was a major Mayan port city that was believed to have flourished between 700-900 AD. Though others place it much older, and even perhaps older still, since the finds at Nakbe in the Petén, it may go back to 1000 BCE, and beyond. Since there was no rock quarry or stone to use in the area, they built the buildings out of bricks made of baked mud. The Maya raised HUGE structures made out of these bricks. That in itself makes this place unique to all the other Mayan locations. But, you see, the bricks have inscriptions on them.

    In 1977 and 1978 the National Institute of Anthropology and History excavated the site and discovered that it was made up entirely of these bricks. And the site is HUGE. What they also found was that approximately 3% of the bricks had inscriptions on them, on the INSIDE. In a study conducted by Mexican archeologist Neil Steede of the National Institute of Anthropology and History, he discovered that 3,671 bricks had inscriptions. Of these bricks, 2,129 had Mayan inscriptions on them. But 499 of the bricks were found to have completely out of place inscriptions. 13.6% of the bricks were found to have Old World inscriptions on them. These inscriptions include writing in Arabic, Phoenician, Libyan, Egyptian, Ogam, Tifinag, Chinese, Burmese, and Paliburmese. In all, about 17.3% of the bricks were inscribed with different languages, but if they had any Mayan inscriptions on them, they were designated to the Mayan inscription pile. Other bricks from this site had drawings on them, and 308 of the bricks were completely unknown and indecipherable.

    According to Steede, all of the bricks were carefully photographed, and copies sent to the Epigraphic Society of San Diego, California, where the languages were identified and verified. Several of the bricks had Mayan inscriptions and another language---typical translations. Some of the bricks were decorated with elephants, and other creatures not indigenous to the Americas.

If anyone find out any further information, please let us know. Thank you.


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